Feminist Disney

professionaldaydreamer2:

AMAZING TIPS for How To Make Your Actors Seem More Like Real Disabled People:

1. cast real disabled people

these gender rolls taste disgusting
emmersdrawberry:

Little Red Riding Hood! 
Late night doodlin’ yesterday.

emmersdrawberry:

Little Red Riding Hood! 

Late night doodlin’ yesterday.

mappedbird:

i say this a lot but:

do uh, ppl get when criticizing media there are two important things to remember - 

  • visibility =/= power
  • characters do not have uh, agency? like, at all? 
Hey, do you plan to do reviews on more Disney channel shows? I'd love to see your opinion on more recent shows like Liv and Maddie or Gravity Falls etc. :)

I would be up for it- feel free to answer to this post with what you all want to see! In terms of reviews, since I tend to do them only every so often

TBH I tried to watch Gravity Falls and I just couldn’t get into it?? Maybe it was just a bad choice of episodes because it seems like a lot of people like it. It wasn’t bad or anything I just literally couldn’t make myself sit through three episodes at the time.

Also apparently Tumblr wasn’t alerting me to the fact that I have a fair # of recent messages… sorry all :(

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)
shout out to all the confused people who find their way to my inbox

shout out to all the confused people who find their way to my inbox

This is definitely a more dense piece to wade through, but it certainly has interesting observations about the portrayal of masculinity in Pixar movies (and also contrasts a bit to Disney — even though they now own Pixar, the studios themselves are still distinct). 

The films in Pixar’s collection show a patterned reliance on controlling images associated with the embodiment of masculinity that shores up the very systems of gender inequality the films are often lauded as challenging.

To be clear, I like these films – and clearly, many of them are a significant step in a new direction. Yet, we continue to implicitly exalt controlling images of masculine embodiment that reiterate gender relations between men and exaggerate gender dimorphism between men and women.

La Jaguarina: Queen of the Sword (1859 or 1864-?)

rejectedprincesses:

image

In April 1896, hardened military veteran US Sergeant Charles Walsh, in front of a crowd of 4,000 onlookers, turned tail and ran. Mere minutes earlier, during a round of equestrian fencing, he’d been hit so hard he’d been nearly knocked off his horse – so hard that his opponent’s sword was permanently bent backwards in a U shape. In response, Walsh did the honorable thing: jumped from his horse, claimed that the judge was cheating, and fled the scene, to the jeers of the massive crowd.

His opponent? A woman known as La Jaguarina, Queen of Swords – an undefeated sword master who later retired only because she ran out of people to fight. Had she born 25 years later, according to the US Fencing Fall of Fame, she might be recognized as “the world’s first great woman fencer.” This week we tell the tale of this largely-forgotten heroine.

Read More

I know I’ve posted about this website before, but the crossover appeal to what goes on here can not be understated! Definitely a blog worth following. 

But Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Chase Manhattan Bank, an JPMorgan Chase are not powerful because they worked hard. The best illustration of this point comes through a historical analysis. How did the banking system in this country get started? How did the richest people in the richest country in the world get their money?

Banking got started in this country by investing in the Triangular Slave Trade. The reason historians call it Triangular Slave Trade is that Europeans went to Africa, enslaved the people, brought them to this part of the world, and sold the people for products like hemp, sugarcane, cotton, and then those products were sent to Europe. That is why there were three angles: Africa, the United States, and Europe. The banking system—Lloyd’s of London, Barclays Bank, Bank of America, Wells Fargo-invested in that process and that is how their hegemony was established. In the last five years, almost all the banks I just mentioned have reluctantly acknowledged that they became established through the institution of slavery and the slave trade. So we see many people today questioning the system considering this simple fact: ‘Because the banks got rich by exploiting my ancestors I don’t see why I should have to pay them anything. They owe me if anything. I don’t want their money, because there is no price tag that can be placed on the suffering.’

Ahjamu Umi, from a guest lecture on March 21, 2013 at Concordia University

See also: “Wachovia apologizes for slavery ties,” CNN Money, June 5, 2005 & “American finance grew on the backs of slaves,” Chicago Sun-Times, March 7, 2014.

For more reading on the origins of the present American banking system and its foundations in the Euro-American slave trade, check out Slavery and American Economic Development (2006) by Gavin Wright and Debt, investment, slaves: credit relations in East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, 1825-1885 (1995) by Richard Kilbourne.

(via cerebralproxy)

Do you find Alice in Wonderland to be pro-feminist?

How exactly would you define pro-feminist??

I think it depends on that, and it’s why I prefer saying “feminist-friendly” — otherwise, simply having a female lead who talks and does things by herself often becomes this very watered down definition of what it means to be “pro-feminist”

I’m not really talking about that movie in particular, just saying

feministdisney:

Hallo children of the tumbls… if any of you live in the Rochester (ny) area and would like to come to a house gathering of mine this next Friday, let me know. Could be fun! Seems strange to ask this stuff on Tumblr but I’ve met a couple friends this way.

If interested, contact the Facebook version of Feminist Disney and I’ll link you an invite. I won’t care if you change your mind about coming haha (everyone always seems worried about that)

my little sister is auditioning for beauty and the beast jr and I showed her a picture of Toni Braxton as Belle and she goes "She's black?! So I can be Belle!!" and it was the most heartbreaking thing ever that she would think she can't be a lead just because of her race. Thought I'd share

airedmania:

brownandwhat:

Vine - Sadia Arabia

Ooooooh the double standard…

WELP.